Good for Canada:
A platform to end income inequality in Canada

This election, cast a vote that’s good for Canada.
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Good Jobs

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Canada works when all who want a job have a good job. Better wages mean more money flowing back into our economy. But too many Canadians are struggling in low paying, insecure jobs.

Good Safety Net

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No one should be left behind in prosperous Canada. And yet, too many are, from veterans, marginalized Canadians, newcomers, and First Nations people to families living with disabilities.

Good Public Programs

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Canada prospers when we invest in people so they can invest back in Canada. Good social programs remove barriers so that all Canadians can become contributing members of society.

Progressive Taxation

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After 15 years of tax cuts that have resulted in cuts to public services, it’s time to rethink Canada’s tax system. Progressive taxation will allow us to invest in the things that matter.

What if this federal election featured a
comprehensive platform to end income inequality?

We could create a more resilient, healthier, safer, more equal Canada.

READ THE PLATFORM

Good Jobs

Tanya’s story

 

Tanya graduated with a PhD, student debt and few prospects for a job in her field. She worries we’re losing a generation of our best and brightest because we’re not training them for the jobs of today. And we’re saddling them with massive debt.

 

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John’s story

 

John lost his job. He went from being comfortably middle class to living on less than $300 a month. Now he knows how impossible it is to find a good job while living in grinding poverty.

 

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Good Jobs

Tanya’s Story

Tanya graduated with a PhD, student debt and few prospects for a job in her field. She worries we’re losing a generation of our best and brightest because we’re not training them for the jobs of today. And we’re saddling them with massive debt.

 

Learn More

John’s Story

John lost his job. He went from being comfortably middle class to living on less than $300 a month. Now he knows how impossible it is to find a good job while living in grinding poverty.

 

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Good Safety Net

Vesna and Robin’s Story

Vesna is 79. Robin is 54 and mentally challenged. Vesna needs to plan what will happen to Robin after she’s gone but the waiting list for supportive housing is long and many residences are overcrowded.

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Claude’s Story

Claude spent 20 years of service in the Canadian military and came home badly injured with PTSD. Claude’s wife Jenny is his constant support and advocate. They need help. But like so many veterans, they’re not getting it.

 

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Good Public Programs

Jillann’s Story

Jillann had a good job but had to give it up because she couldn’t afford childcare. She is back in school so she can get a better paying job but wonders how many others have had to choose between their job and their child.

 

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Ingrid’s Story

Ingrid longs for meaningful work. She’s legally blind and the statistics say the odds are against her. In the meantime, she is an active volunteer and does what she can to give her kids a better life.

 

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Audrey’s Story

Audrey believes that a National Public Commission of Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls needs to happen as soon as possible but only if it includes the families and communities.

 

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Progressive Taxation

Gary’s Story

Gary is a doctor at a busy downtown hospital and also at a homeless shelter. His patients are sicker than they should be because they live in poverty. He believes he and others who are well off should be taxed more to create a better Canada.

 

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Kristyn’s Story

A high earner, Kristyn believes she and others like her should pay more. In a Canada where good jobs are slipping away and good, affordable day care is inaccessible to many, Kristyn believes it’s more important than ever to invest in a good social safety net.

 

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Good Safety Net

Jenny and Claude’s story

 

Claude spent 20 years of service in the Canadian military and came home badly injured with PTSD. Claude’s wife Jenny is his constant support and advocate. They need help. But like so many veterans, they’re not getting it.

Learn More

Vesna and Robin’s story

 

Vesna is 79. Robin is 54 and developmentally disabled. Vesna needs to plan what will happen to Robin after she’s gone but the waiting list for supportive housing is long and many residences are overcrowded.

 

Learn More

Good Public Programs

Jillann’s story

 

Jillann had a good job but had to give it up because she couldn’t afford childcare. She is back in school so she can get a better paying job but wonders how many others have had to choose between their job and their child.

 

Learn More

Ingrid’s story

 

Ingrid longs for meaningful work. She’s legally blind and the statistics say the odds are against her. In the meantime, she is an active volunteer and does what she can to give her kids a better life.

 

Learn More

Audrey’s story

 

Audrey believes that a National Public Commission of Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls needs to happen as soon as possible but only if it includes the families and communities.

 

Learn More

Progressive Taxation

Gary’s story

 

Gary is a doctor at a busy downtown hospital and also at a homeless shelter. His patients are sicker than they should be because they live in poverty. He believes he and others who are well off should be taxed more to create a better Canada.

 

Learn More

Kristyn’s story

 

A high earner, Kristyn believes she and others like her should pay more. In a Canada where good jobs are slipping away and good, affordable day care is inaccessible to many, Kristyn believes it’s more important than ever to invest in a good social safety net.

 

Learn More

Some concerning figures about income inequality in Canada

32%

Share of income gains from economic growth for Canada’s richest 1% between 1997 and 2007.

1996

The year that Canada’s federal government stopped raising the federal minimum wage.

195

Canada's highest paid CEOs make 195 times more than Canadians earning the average wage.

45%

Percentage of Canadians who told a pollster that they are optimistic about the future of Canada’s middle class.

Some concerning figures about income inequality in Canada

32%

Share of income gains from economic growth for Canada’s richest 1% between 1997 and 2007.

1996

The year that Canada's federal government stopped raising the federal minimum wage.

195

Canada's highest paid CEOs make 195 times more than Canadians earning the average wage.

45%

Percentage of Canadians who told a pollster that they are optimistic about the future of Canada’s middle class.

 

This election, cast a vote that’s good for Canada.